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#27

How to separate a good cold brew from the bad

Hint: it's the roast. Cold brew has exploded recently, especially with the covid-19 situation. It allows us to enjoy the goodness of cafes in the comfort of our own homes. But are all cold brews made equal? Of course not, here's what separates the good, the bad and the ugly.

Ahh cold brew, the delicious sweet nectar of the gods. Or is it? Have you tried making cold brew with a light roasted coffee? It's terrible. It was sour, lacked sweetnes or any kind of texture and basically turned into nothing once you added milk into the coffee.

Moral of the story? Don't use light roasted coffees for cold brew.

Got a different opinion? Let me know in the comments about your cold brew recipe and i'll try it out with a light roast.



Now just to be clear, cold brew and cold drip are not the same. They are two different styles of brewing, so do specify which method you are using in your recipes.

The main thing I would suggest for cold brews is to find a medium roast level, well-developed coffee for cold brew. The roast should be developed enough such that there is reduced acidity and the coffee is easier to extract with cold water. A light roast would have too much acidity to create a balanced brew. 

Having said that, you also don't want a roast that is too dark otherwise you risk having very smokey and charred, bitter flavours in your coffee. Unless you are looking to add in a good amount of milk, syrups and other condiments and need the coffee to cut through these additions, it probably won't taste very pleasant.

So, how do you brew your cold brew?

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